Most Failed Courses at Rhodes College

Article by Evan Katz, Rhodes College — Sure colleges like to be different from one another, boasting about their “groundbreaking research” and “renowned professors” and “state of the art” blah blah blah!

But on the course difficulty level, we’re pretty sure taking Oceanography will be easy across a sample of colleges, and taking Managerial Accounting equally tough. Unless you’re attending some online college 😉

So this is why we’ve created our two epic series: most failed courses and easy A courses. So you can browse through and get a accurate as heck perspective of what to avoid and what to load on your schedule.

In this edition, our intern at Rhodes College discusses the difficult courses at his school. Heads up!

Biology – One of the few classes on campus that has the possibility of mentally maiming you. A requirement for all pre-med students, it’s rumored that this class is purposely made near impossible to pass in order to make a future of cutting people up and then patching them up again feel like a breeze.

Spanish – Spanish, and all language classes really, have the added difficultly of being taught in the actual language you’re trying to learn. This would be the equivalent of being taught geometry by a hexagon. Wait, that actually doesn’t make much sense.

Chemistry Could have seen this one coming. Who can keep track of all those electrons anyway? Most college students’ interest in chemicals only extend to the ones that make the opposite gender look better and, ironically, will probably hinder a good chemistry grade.

Philosophy – College classes are hard enough without having to question the very fabric of your existence several times a week. Once you have a go at writing a thesis statement on how your thesis doesn’t actually exist you’ll consider yourself lucky to escape this class with your mind intact, much less a passing grade.

Multivariable Calculus Weren’t we all set with one variable? Some greedy and presumably evil mathematicians decided that they weren’t quite having enough fun with just a single, lonely variable so they had to bring some more into the mix, effectively turning calculus from a perplexing yet manageable curve into a clusterfuck of squiggles.

To take note of these bad boys when planning your schedule!

by Evan Katz

2 thoughts on “Most Failed Courses at Rhodes College

  1. Me and Calculus: “Wait, what happened to the numbers? Isn’t math supposed to have numbers??? Screw it, I’ll go take a Philosophy class.”

  2. I note that at the time of Mr. Katz’s writing, he is a first-year student at Rhodes College and that he plans to major in English. Thus it is unlikely that he has had many (maybe even any) of the courses he critiques. He passes on then, not useful valid information, but instead mere rumor rampant amongst the most angst-ridden demographic at a college — namely, first year students who, after been seen as natural-born talents in high school, now must confront that fact that real academics requires them to stretch in unaccustomed ways — and sometimes to fail when making that effort. Mr. Katz criticizes, for instance, the teaching of Spanish in Spanish — I suppose Evan learned English in some other way? The goal isn’t to learn “about” Spanish (Spanish lite), but rather to communicate naturally in the language. Similarly, Katz’s fellow English-major-hopefuls say it’s “rumored” that intro Bio tries to cut down on the number who’re left to go on to more advanced courses — but have you ever seen a program or business that wants fewer “customers”, not more? Bio, Chem, and Philosophy (etc.) profs work their butts off to bring students along in their subjects — and with great success. If Intro Bio, Intro Chem, etc. are hard, that’s only because that’s the nature of the subjects. Playing violin is hard too (and you can lose a lot of self esteem while trying) — but are you going to knock the violin and those who’ve put in the time to get good enough to play it and teach it just because the task itself is hard? Any serious study of any serious subject is hard. Get used to it — or take up the kazoo instead.

Add Comment